April 26th 2017

World / East Africa

Sudan displays its rich culture in Kenya; CS Wario applauds strong ties between the two countries

Dr Wario appreciated the rich Sudan culture and said it will strengthen its cordial relations with Kenya. “Sudan offers the cradle of human kind and together with Kenya and Ethiopia provide a clear history of mankind”, he said.

By Phillip MuleeTuesday, 04 Apr 2017 17:09 EAT

Sudan delegates.

Sudan's rich cultural heritage is being displayed in Kenya as the country moves to claim its stake in the African continent and shape its image internationally in an attempt to plead for the lifting of biting economic sanctions imposed by the United States and other Western powers. The one-week Sudan Cultural Festival was officially opened today by Cabinet Secretary for Culture and Sports Hassan Wario at Kenyatta International Convention Centre (KICC).

It was an event attended by several ambassadors based in Nairobi, led by host Sudan Ambassador H.E Elsadig Abdalh Alyas and a delegation of Council for Sudanese in the Diaspora who are spearheading the image shaping of their country. The event included a 15-minute documentary on what Sudan can offer, cultural performance, a lecture about Sudan and exhibition.

It will also be conducted at the United State International University (USIU), St. Paul University and University of Nairobi, Parklands Campus. Cultural performance for the public will be done at Uhuru Park on Friday. Dr Wario appreciated the rich Sudan culture and said it will strengthen its cordial relations with Kenya. “Sudan offers the cradle of human kind and together with Kenya and Ethiopia provide a clear history of mankind”, he said.

The CS cited the Sudan pyramids which he said should also be displayed in Kenya for the citizens to see the hidden heritage that country can offer. “Kenya and Sudan will continue engaging in friendly cordial relationship. President Kenyatta visited Khartoum last year where he held bilateral talks with President Omar Hassan Ahmad al-Bashir and signed several agreements. I am happy to note that Sudan is the third largest buyer of our tea”, he said.

Ambassador Elsadig Abdalh Alyas said the relations between Kenya and Sudan are historical noting that when his country gained independence in 1956, among the first African countries, it helped Kenya through support of Mau Mau fighters and other countries in Africa as they fought for their liberation.

He said the well glued culture in Sudan has maintained harmony among the 400 tribes with 400 different languages. He said even though his country was Islamic, other religions were also there. “Our country is very rich in resources being the leading African country with highly sophisticated irrigation scheme from River Nile while the country can produce 92 tons of gold annually” he said.

The rich Sudan Culture much of which is derived from the ancient Nubian kingdoms of the Nile Valley have made it a paradise for archaeologists. From a distance you see the pyramids at the Royal Cemetery of Meroë rising in the desert. Altogether there are 225 pyramids in the Sudanese Nile Valley – a precious heritage.

Nubia’s once-powerful rulers moved their capital several times, so ruins of old cities and royal burial places can be found at several locations along the river. The pyramids contain glassware, pottery, jewels and other valuable artefacts.

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