December 12th 2017

Top Stories / National

Lusaka wants Luyia leaders to rally behind Webukala, Chebukati

“This region is full of egocentric leaders who have no community interests at heart but are always politicking to remain relevant. Aren’t those complaining the ones who were crying about the community being locked out of major appointments?" the governor posed.

By Phillip MuleeThursday, 05 Jan 2017 14:44 EAT

Retired Anglican Archbishop Eliud Wabukala today appeared before Parliament's Justice and Legal Affairs Committee (JLAC) for vetting before the whole House approves or rejects his appointment as chairperson of the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission. But as the grilling was taking place within Parliament Buildings, social media was awash with critical reactions as to whether the retired Archbishop should have sought the job.

Jubilee point man Kenneth Lusaka also lashed out at Luhya politicians opposed to Mr Webukala and lawyer Wafula Chebukati who is simultaniously facing vetting for appointment as chairman of the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC). The IEBC Selection Panel settled on Mr Chebukati alongside High Court advocate Tukero ole Kina on December 23. Wabukala, who is retired ACK Archbishop, was chosen from a list of six people who had been shortlisted for the position of EACC chairman.

Bungoma Governor Lusaka wondered why leaders who have been complaining about being sidelined by Jubilee were the same ones rejecting the appointments. “This region is full of egocentric leaders who have no community interests at heart but are always politicking to remain relevant. Aren’t those complaining the ones who were crying about the community being locked out of major appointments?" the governor posed.

Politicians allied to Bungoma Senator Moses Wetang'ula's Ford-Kenya party have criticised the appointment of the two nominees, saying the government is only looking for votes from the populous Bukusu sub-tribe, the largest Luyia group that dominates Trans Nzoia and Bungoma counties.

On social media, opinion was divided about Mr Webukala's interest in the anti-graft job, with some Kenyans fearing that it would mark the start of unprecedented cooperation between the government and religious leaders.

Those who held this view believed that Mr Webukala remained a respected religious leader and his involved in murky politics of anti-corruption would further erode the confidence of Kenyans in the clergy, some of whose members have faced integrity challenges in recent years.

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