November 23rd 2017

Top Stories / Counties

Residents petition national government to tame monkeys

Furthermore the residents said that they are also facing water scarcity and they have to walk for more than 7 kilometers for water which has inconvenienced their other activities.

By Joshua Mwangangijmwangangi@kenyafreepress.comSaturday, 15 Jul 2017 12:03 EAT

Residents of a village in Mwingi Sub County, Kitui County are up in arms against monkeys threatening their lives and property. The residents from Muthuzuu, Nzeluni and Ikoo villages have consequently petitioned the Kenya Wildlife Services (KWS) through the national government to tame the animals by returning them to the national parks away and help the farmers protect their crops.

The angry residents said that monkeys from Ikoo valley forest in Migwani have been frequently invading their farms thus destroying their crops. They added that some of them have stopped farming due to the fear of losing the crops to the animals.

The residents raised alarm after the wild animals went ahead and started killing and eating their goats. They said that the fearless creatures may also start to attack their young children. Adding that the invasion was costing them a lot as they have to do away with other activities to guard their farms or else hire other people to guard them on their behalf.

“Some people from this area have stopped growing crops for fear of Monkeys invasion”, said Alex Musyoka Mwangangi.

Furthermore the residents said that they are also facing water scarcity and they have to walk for more than 7 kilometers for water which has inconvenienced their other activities. The residents said it’s a challenge for them because they depend on donkeys or their backs to carry water and it’s difficult to carry enough litres for domestic use because the area is steepy and the donkey can only carry forty litres.

The residents are appealing to both the National and County Governments to construct water catchment reservoir at Muthunzuu rock which can store water for use during dry seasons.

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