April 29th 2017

Top Stories / 2017 Elections

As CORD searches for 'bigwigs', Jubilee in all out effort to reach voters directly

In a column in last week's Saturday Nation, political strategist Peter Kagwanja said that the ruling coalition had succeeded in making the narrative of 41 tribes again one a mirage since the inclusion of William Ruto in the government as deputy president.

By Reuben Gitahigitahireuben@gmail.comSaturday, 14 Jan 2017 16:37 EAT

President Uhuru Kenyatta with his supporters at the Kasarani Stadium yesterday. (Photo: Courtesy/President's Facebook page).

The Jubilee Party is buoyant of beating the opposition come the August general election, if the Kasarani Stadium meeting to launch the party’s smart card is anything to go by. In a show of might at the Kasarani Stadium, Jubilee made some strategic changes by disbanding the 63-member team who had been appointed to chaperone the presidential campaign last year.

According to the party's strategists, this was a calculated move since many saw the party losing grips with its aspirants who saw the party as a vehicle that was being led by a few aristocrats in the top echelons of the party. Political strategist Mutahi Ngunyi had said in his popular YouTube channel, The Fifth Estate, that if Jubilee was to beat the CORD coalition, it needed to adopt the 'matatu strategy' divergent from CORD's plan of inculcating bigwigs from different regions.

But it is the Jubilee leaders' jibe on the opposition at the Kasarani smart card launch that has got tongues wagging. Deputy president William Ruto tore off the opposition as a bunch of “clueless, radarless, leaderless, planless, disorganized opposition”. This is after the opposition renewed their commitment to come together under the umbrella of the National Super Alliance (NASA) which brings together leaders of the CORD, Wiper, Ford-Kenya, Amani Coalition and KANU, at the Bomas last Wednesday.

The opposition had promised to put a spirited fight to make Uhuru Kenyatta a one term president. However, with the NASA line-up yet to be named despite months of commitments, a united opposition seems untenable, and some pundits claim the opposition could fragment even further if the leaders were to disagree on the presidential flagbearer. This notwithstanding, some of the leaders being courted by the opposition, such as Kanu secretary general Nick Salat, have limited political clout, having lost one election after another.

In a column in last week's Saturday Nation, political strategist Peter Kagwanja said Jubilee had succeeded in making the narrative of 41 tribes again one a mirage since the inclusion of William Ruto in the government as deputy president. Yesterday, the deputy president said that in 2013, the duo carried political baggage of charges at the International Criminal Court while the main opposition was in government, with its presidential candidate holding the position of prime minister and his running mate the vice president. "How can we lose now?" he posed.

The writer is an experienced journalist, lecturer and researcher based in Nairobi





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