November 25th 2017

Society / Environment

NEMA to charge election aspirants for 'poster pollution'

Meanwhile, IEBC Communications and Public Affairs Manager Andrew Limo welcomed the move saying it was the right of Kenyans to have a clean environment. “It is a great initiative that should be supported but should be taken by NEMA and county government,” Mr Limo said.

By Jackson Okataamboleokata@gmail.comWednesday, 12 Apr 2017 09:22 EAT

A Jubilee Party campaign bus ready for launch.

All political aspirants will have to pay environment deposit bonds with National Environment Management Authority (NEMA) to facilitate the clearance of posters after the August general elections. According to NEMA Compliance and Enforcement Officer Zephania Ouma, the environment deposit bond is a provision in the Environment Management Coordination (EMCA) Act 2013.

“EMCA Act is clear on the deposit bond NEMA will hold a meeting with Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) and Council of Governors (CoG) on how to make it operational,” Mr Ouma said. He added that the EMCA Act stipulates how much should be paid as deposit bonds hence the need for the three institutions to deliberate and give the direction.

“We will also deliberate whether it will be the party/coalition to deposit the bond on behalf of aspirants or individual aspirant. The recommendations of the meeting will be communicated in a week’s time,” Ouma said. Ouma meanwhile reiterated that, the deposit bond will be refundable but only if the aspirants clear their posters and the NEMA officials ascertain it.

“The deposit bond will be deposited in the NEMA Environment Restoration Fund account. County will also be included to make the exercise effective,” Mr Ouma added.

Mr Ouma indicated that the deposit bond is applicable to industrial plants and undertakings which have or more likely to have adverse effects on the environment. “The purpose of this environment deposit bond is to ensure; Good environmental practices; adequate remediation is achieved without adversely affecting economic viability,” he said.

Other purposes are to ensure compliance with remediation obligations, availability of funds for remediation and sustainable development.

Meanwhile, IEBC Communications and Public Affairs Manager Andrew Limo welcomed the move saying it was the right of Kenyans to have a clean environment. “It is a great initiative that should be supported but should be taken by NEMA and county government,” Mr Limo said.

The writer is contributing reporter for the Kenya Free Press based in Nakuru County





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