April 25th 2017

Society / Education

Tension grips Moi University as 500 students 'blocked from graduation'

While the crisis affects students from nearly all schools, the most affected is the School of Human Resource management, and to some extent the School of Education. The administration claims the students' name cannot be entered in the List because their marks for some course units are missing.

By Free Press Reporternewsdesk@kenyafreepress.comTuesday, 29 Nov 2016 18:23 EAT

Moi University Main Campus

Moi University has been gripped by tension following the administration's decision barring over 500 students who have finished their degree programmes from graduation. The students, who studied mainly in the university's Main Campus and Nairobi Campus, have been informed that the compilation of the Graduation List is complete yet their names are missing from the List. A number of students from the Nairobi Campus have travelled to the Main Campus in Eldoret in order to lodge complaints with the Vice Chancellor tomorrow Wednesday 30 Novemeber.

According to information reaching the Kenya Free Press, the students could hold a demonstration in Eldoret on Thursday if they shall not have got the audience of the Vice Chancellor and assurance that their names would be included to the List for the graduation scheduled for December 16. Other students in Nairobi may stage a demonstration and lodge a petition to the cabinet secretary for education Dr Fred Matiangi on th issue.

While the crisis over the missing names has been reported by students from nearly all the schools, the most affected is the School of Human Resource management, and to some extent the School of Education. The administration claims the affected students' names cannot be entered in the List because their marks for some course units are missing. However, at least 100 students have been informed that their course marks have been received by the schools after compilation of the List was closed.

A quick analysis of the cases confirmed to the Kenya Free Press on the missing marks indicates that courses taught by part-time lecturers are the most affected. We also learnt that a number of part-time lecturers contracted by the university had not been paid their dues since 2013. The part-timers include a substantil number of lecturers in full time employment at other universities and colleges, but quite a number depended on their work for Moi University as their main source of income, raising questions about their morale, commitment to work and the credibility of the marks they award to students.

Some students who complained about the marks completed their courses up to three months ago but are yet to see their course marks. Some had seen the marks and confirmed that the marks were received by the respective Dean's offices as early as September and October. In the School of Human Resources, junior staff and clerks at the Dean's office are accused of incompetently and slowly entering and relaying the marks. According to sources, the staff don't act or respond quickly to communication from departments expeditiously. Our attempts to reach the Dean, Ruth Tubey, to verify specific complaints about her officers' work ethics were unsuccessful as calls placed on her telephone line didn't go through.

The crisis has caused tensions in the university, with some students alleging that the problem affects only students from specific ethnic communities. "All my marks were in by September. Some students whose marks were received just two weeks ago have been entered on the List, so we can see clearly that this is not a matter of time but a plot by some people in the administration to punish students from some ethnic groups for reasons only they can explain," said an exersperated student.

.





Stay Connected