November 22nd 2017

Opinion / Letters

Washiali should stop misleading Luyias, he's not a performer

It is not even surprising to know that despite the fact that politicians such as Moses Wetangula, Aden Duale, and many others are very popular and influential, the people they represent live in deplorable conditions and below the poverty lines.

By Thomas Matalangatmatalanga@kenyafreepress.comTuesday, 20 Sep 2016 20:25 EAT

The recent claim by Mumias East MP Benjamin Washiali that the Luhya community was "tired of languishing in the cold" is wanting indeed. The Kenyan electorate certainly must wake up from these mockeries by dubious and unscrupulous politicians who use the excuse of tribe or ethnicity to propagate their individual interest at the expense of the ordinary mwananchi.

What is ironical about Hon Washiali’s comments is that it isn’t the first time a politician has used his or her ethnicity to win an elective office. However what is even worse is the fact that these same politicians always promise development and growth of their communities either economically or socially and which in the long run are never fulfilled.

This kind of behavior should end since every citizen regardless of ethnicity is entitled by right through the constitution, the supreme law of the land to get quality services as well as development and growth. It is not a guarantee that just because a politician promises to bring development for a marginalized community, he or she will deliver.

It is not even surprising to know that despite the fact that politicians such as Moses Wetangula, Aden Duale, and many others are very popular and influential, the people they represent live in deplorable conditions and below the poverty lines.

The talk of “I will liberate our community from poverty,” or “this community is tired of languishing in the cold“ is a clear description of what our political turf has become over the years since independence. It yet another indication that our politics are tribal based rather than ideological. Politicians might take as for fools but we need to show them that we are way beyond their lame excuses.

We are what we seek and therefore have the fate of our country in our very own hands. Our politicians will join and form new parties which will certainly boast of their manifestos but will fall at the last hurdle when they come to seek for our votes come election time next year with statements which are divisive rather than inclusive. The inclusivity will always lack in any new political formation. Either way that’s just my opinion, after all am I not entitled to it!

Matalanga is a student of journalism at the East Africa School of Media Studies and an intern writer at the Kenya Free Press.





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