November 23rd 2017

Opinion / Commentaries

Cry of a Diaspora Kenyan - My Kikuyu friends, don't lose your humanity

There's a line that none of us Kenyans should never ever cross: that we hate our political opponents so much so that we cheer when they are being run over by vehicles, maimed and killed by the police, and armed militia in police uniform.

By Nyang'wara Ben-MosesSaturday, 14 Oct 2017 12:38 EAT

An opposition MP is teargassed by anti-riot police during yesterday's demo by NASA supporters. Some Kenyans cheered this cruel act.

Some of the most ardent and rabid supporters of Jubilee are Diaspora Kikuyu. There's nothing wrong with that. What's disturbing, however, is the casual manner in which they dismiss the fact that their own government in Kenya which they are enthusiastically supporting is openly engaging in serious crimes that are totally unacceptable, and outright criminal, in the very countries that they have sought abode.

As participants in democracy, we all must pick sides in political contests because ideas are the currency of political discourse that ought to guide us in picking the best leaders with the best wares in the marketplace of those ideas. However, there's a line that none of us Kenyans should never ever cross: that we hate our political opponents so much so that we cheer when they are being run over by vehicles, maimed and killed by the police, and armed militia in police uniform.

When pictures of bloodied bodies of young demonstrators killed by police bullets are shared amongst friends and they elicit some of the most crass, vile, and insensitive comments made to a fellow fallen Kenyan, you know that we have undoubtedly crossed the aforementioned line; the Rubicon itself. 

In the USA, the same Kikuyus who were livid a few years back about Treyvon Martin's murder, the Baltimore and Ferguson Missouri Riots due to police brutality on black youths, are today celebrating when Kalenjin, Somali, and Kikuyu cops openly use live ammunition on youthful Kenyans exercising their right to demonstrate in Nairobi or Luo Nyanza.

Lately, I have kept minimum communication with few of the Kikuyus I used to consider as friends in America. The very people who were proud to be Kenyans because a black man of Kenyan/Luo roots was president of the USA a few years ago, are today celebrating as police kill and maim Luo youths in a selective elimination process masterminded by a government thirsting for legitimacy locally and internationally after the Supreme Court nullified the 8/8 presidential election results in which a discredited Jubilee-controlled IEBC tried to shove down our collective throat numbers generated by vifaranga vya kompyuta.

For nearly twenty five years now, I have always wondered how Tutsis and Hutus could turn on each other with such hatred leading to genocide, but seeing how lots of Kikuyus - from illiterate street hustlers to highly educated opinion shapers, Diaspora professionals, and the president himself - have conducted themselves as if they are the only Kenyans worthy of the presidency, and anyone else seeking it is asking for it is a pest worthy of elimination - clearly shows that the genocidal tendencies of the Hutus and Tutsis of Rwanda of the 1990s abound in Kenya today ; especially amongst some of our Kikuyu folk. How fast they have forgotten how it feels to be (mis)treated as lesser Kenyans - as it happened to them in the Nyayo era that lasted for nearly twenty five years!

In the Rwandan genocide of the 1990s, one of the leading proponents of ethnic cleansing against the Hutus was a respected SDA church leader. In Kenya today, the man leading the selective murder and elimination of Luo folk is an SDA cabinet minister whose hubris and delusional sense of infallibility rivals that of the tragical Icarus who, in Greek mythology, soared too high and the sun melted his waxed wings, plunging him into a watery grave.

Kenya survived Jomo, Moi, Biwott and company. It will survive Uhuru, Ruto, Matiangi and company.

The writer is a former Moi University student leader currently residing in the United States.





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