November 24th 2017

Opinion / Commentaries

Why Njuri Ncheke has become a council of opportunists

Elders deserve much respect and must be qualified to earn it. But if they start going rogue by blackmailing and threatening leaders with curses in their unmistakable pursuit for material gains, that’s when and where they will be stripped and starved of their much-deserving respect.

By Athanas Kipchumbaakipchumba@kenyafreepress.comSunday, 21 May 2017 15:26 EAT

Members of the Njuri Ncheke.

Nothing has in the recent past left me in stitches like a newspaper story entitled Njuri Ncheke Curses CS Kaimenyi, Brands Him an Outcast, which I stumbled upon recently. I could not help read through the story that captured the imagination of the elderly people who seem to eke out a living through unjustified and foul means, like threatening people with curses.

One thinks loudly of the integrity of this crop of elders and mulls over their true intentions. In most African communities, curses were and are still the preserve of the elderly men/women. And in many instances, they’re not supposed to be misused. In fact, those individuals with penchant for cursing others with the aim of pursuing their narrow individualistic material ends are either skinned alive or ostracized. Or perhaps both can apply.

Those who grab and steal people’s properties, murderers, rapists and other wicked-minded individuals whose terrible activities or actions spell doom and gloom among the general populace are always cursed by the elders, in the highest hope that woes and miseries befall them.

Well, if the butt of the elders’ malediction fails to “repent” and admit his felonious offense, he anticipates the worst following the elders’ curses. Let me say this. Curses will only affect and inflict the person who believes in the miracles, power and impact of a curse. Curses also will have dreadful, fatal and dire consequences upon some very serious criminal offenders who, in their own indolence and overweening attitudes, vehemently deny and fiercely protest against any wrongdoing when the opposite is the truth.

In cursing ‘ritual’, whatever this means, the solemnity of its ambience and involvement of oath-taking preceded with noticeable abracadabra underscores the seriousness of cursing somebody. It’s not a laughing matter. It’s a matter of life and death!

However, curses will not affect, in my opinion, minor offenders and repented sinners or transgressors. Otherwise multitudes of people who have been verbally or “experimentally” or practically cursed would have gone to the alternative world. Or at least, would be suffering from curse-inflicted woes.

If Prof Jacob Kaimenyi knows that he’s not wronged the entire Meru community then he shouldn’t be shaking in his boots. But if he did, I exhort him to apologize with utmost humility and sincerity. The elders claim that the CS engineered and fueled the division among members of the 'dreaded' council.

The seemingly incensed elders also want President Uhuru Kenyatta to sack Prof. Kaimenyi failure to which they will match to State House to “compel” the country’s CEO to fire him. So Dr Kaimenyi is caught between a deep blue sea and hard rock? Staring at a curse, from someone who should be blessing and a dismissal due to somebody else’s pressure? A resounding no.

Will I be wrong to suggest that, with all due respect for aged people within and beyond the borders, Njuri Nchecke elders are a bunch of selfish political brokers which thrive on blackmailing and coercing political leaders in most cases into submitting to their ludicrous demands? On how they “vetted” and “approved” the good professor, and even went ahead recommend to the president for his appointment leaves on the tower of Babel.

Since when did Njuri Ncheke usurp the role of the parliament, if I may honestly ask? This is utterly absurd and asinine, to say the least. These elders must understand that threatening leaders with curses for material gains will serve only to delegitimize the council, if it was really legitimate, and registered by the Registrar of Societies.

Elders deserve much respect and must be qualified to earn it. They are recognized by leaders for their towering wisdom and constructive counsels. But if they start going rogue by blackmailing and threatening leaders with curses in their unmistakable pursuit for material gains, that’s when and where they will be stripped and starved of their much-deserving respect.

Opportunism, sadly though, seems to have made some of the once respected Njuri Ncheke elders go bananas! These tendencies should screech to a halt, if elders like Njuri Ncheke are to occupy their “deserved” place in the hall of respect and reverence.

Kipchumba is a staff writer/columnist at the Kenya Free Press





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