July 26th 2017

Media / Arts & Culture

Organization brings tribal elders together to promote unity

The labyrinth which was constructed using stones brought by elders from their communities was officially opened by TICAH Director Maryanne Burris and Dr Purity Kiura, Director of Antiquities Sites and Monuments.

By Oscar NdundaFriday, 21 Oct 2016 16:48 EAT

Maryanne Burris of the TICAH addressing elders at the Uhuru Gardens in Nairobi. (Photo: Oscar Ndunda/Kenya Free Press).

The Trust for Indigenous Culture and Health (TICAH) in partnership with the National Museums of Kenya on Friday hosted elders drawn from different communities in an effort to promote national unity. The elders sang and prayed together at the Uhuru Gardens in Nairobi where they opened a labyrinth “Mahali Pa Umoja,” (Unity Place).

The meeting, which was the 14th in the organization's programmes, saw the display different plants they use to make medicine in which TICAH seeks to understand and promote health which also links health and culture a move that saw the leaders exchange ideas.

According to the Director, Maryanne Burris, one needs peace to be healthy as she pointed out that Kenyans love each other despite the negative image by other foreign countries that there is tribalism and applauded the meeting which she said had borne fruit as the leaders from different communities held discussions to share what they had learned.

“Kenyans love each other despite the negative image we see from outside and I am happy that the initiative is doing well because some of the elders who come to the meetings go back and discuss what they have learned with the rest of their people,” said Burris.

Ms Burris praised the partnership between TICAH and the National Museums of Kenya for creating a forum where unity can be created and also where elders and the youth can interact. “I am happy that the partnership between TICAH and the National Museums of Kenya was able to create a vacuum where we can promote unity and also the elders and the youth can interact and exchange ideas,” added Ms Burris.

Mr Dennis Ngala, who is the coordinator at the TICAH, pointed out that the interaction between the elders would be of great national benefit:  “Interaction between elders from different communities promotes good practices among the youth, offer good leadership, help in the making of medicines and the fact that we come from different communities and we all have our different cultures it moves us to embrace unity and we do not associate with elders who are political driven as the atmosphere of politics in Kenya are polarized,” said Mr Ngala.

The labyrinth which was constructed using stones brought by elders from their communities was officially opened by TICAH Director Maryanne Burris and Dr Purity Kiura, Director of Antiquities Sites and Monuments.

The writer is the news editor of the Kenya Free Press





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